a Future and a Hope

Care Packages

It has been a long time since we had an article about care packages, and it has been ages since we received one! Granted, they do charge us at the post office a percentage of the amount written on the customs form, but some things we just cannot find in Kenya, and we would love to have them. Here is our wish list! For my friends with horse connections, finding some items are quite difficult. We are extremely happy with used items as long as they are in good condition. I will post the horse items here first because they are difficult to find in Kenya, but if that is not an area of interest for  you, please keep scrolling. We really miss certain things like ranch seasoning packets!

Horse stuff: (I am posting links to products so you can see what we are needing, but if you have used items in good condition, we are happy to use those!)

  • lead ropes (seriously, we have broken most of ours!)
  • 4 hackamores (bitless attachment so our horses can be ridden without bits) see this link or this link
  • 1/4" or 6mm thick parachord 100 ft long for making our own halters preferably turquoise or black, but not really picky!
  • 20 pieces if possible 1" Stainless Steel O rings to make our own bridles
  • 3 crops
  • 3 or so (because they break over time, but one will do!) lunge whips
  • bean bags (very important for our therapy sessions!)
  • plush dice
  • game idea books for horsey games (just search for some on Amazon) We aren't picky, and I don't have any!
  • cones
  • reins
  • breast plates (3 ponies, one horse)
  • Stirrup leathers 
  • stirrups
  • helmets
  • Rope halters
  • saddles obviously not easy to mail so designated funds to buy them here- $400 or so? I found one I really like! 
  • extra money for hay (it is tripled in price at the moment, so we need about $400 for 100 bales)
  • hay nets
  • speakers and ipod for music for therapy. Our speakers are not loud enough.

Meds:

  • Nyquil
  • ibuprofen
  • acetaminophen
  • Children's meds ages 1 year and up
  • vitamin C chewables
  • pepto
  • sore throat meds
  • allergy meds
  • bug bite meds
  • antibacterial cream

Household:

  • Mr. Clean erasers
  • hand towels
  • wash cloths
  • silicone Popsicle molds
  • LED solar twinkle lights (all sorts, these are fun!)
  • flashlights
  • hair bows for baby Starlette
  • hair brushes (remember, we live in a country where we are the minority so finding good hair brushes is difficult)

Food:

  • Ranch
  • TexJoy
  • butt rub
  • seasoned sunflower seeds
  • pistacios
  • pecans
  • almonds
  • marshmallows (both large and small)
  • hersheys
  • chocolate chips
  • peanut butter chips
  • m&m's
  • Reese's cups

school supplies

  • Pens
  • crayons
  • coloring books
  • erasers
  • pencils
  • paint brushes
  • watercolor paper
  • glue
  • notebooks

Pet Supplies

  • Dog sweaters for up on this cold mountain Size Great Dane
  • Dog leashes
  • Chew toys
  • Flea control
  • Dog bed

 


You and me, we are the same?

Something happened at our most recent horse therapy session that I had not thought through before. It makes complete sense, but it just didn't cross my mind until I witnessed it first hand.

Horse therapy 013This is Duncan. He has spina bifida and cannot feel his legs.  In this photo, he is extremely nervous about this new experience of coming to our farm, possibly riding a giant monster, and meeting all of these new people. It was his first therapy session...

It started to drizzle just as everyone arrived so we all gathered on our veranda and sat down. I began entertaining the kids by asking them to get to know one another.

See, usually, they all come, get on a horse, and off they go. It hadn't occurred to me that they didn't know one another until this moment when we were all huddled together seeking shelter.

When I introduced Duncan to Malia who also has spina bifida, I pointed out, "Duncan is just like you, Malia!"

 

Her reaction was priceless! 

Horse therapy 045

Malia just looked Duncan over soaking in the fact that she is not the only person who has spina bifida!

 

It never occurred to me that perhaps these kids have never met someone like themselves before! They are unique, after all!

This is a perk of our horse therapy program that hadn't crossed my mind until this point. 

Horse therapy 246Malia took it upon herself to show Duncan that, although she was afraid her first time getting up on a large equine, now she is a pro and can do it with a smile. She competed wholeheartedly in the games and really worked hard. (Right)

Horse therapy 156It took Duncan quite some time to get used to the horses. In the middle of our session, he was already experiencing fatigue in his core. You can see in this photo how he was lying on the horse because he was too tired to support himself. Therapy sessions are quite a workout, and in time, Duncan will get stronger and stronger. 

We are already seeing results in the other riders' core strength!

One thing is for sure, by the end of the therapy session, Duncan was enjoying himself! (Below)

 

Horse therapy 346

 

 


June Newsletter

I just sent out our June newsletter. Here is the text just in case you do not receive it. Use the link on the side of this blog to sign up.

A Decade of Orphan-Care

Not everything works out. Sometimes failure is unavoidable, other times we can avoid utter failure. Rarely is it possible to have everything work out exactly how we want it to. We have been caring for our orphans no more for a decade now. Ten years of feeding, clothing, housing, schooling, and above all loving unconditionally. There are times when it feels like twenty years instead of ten, and other days it is like we started last week. We cannot report success in everything, but we can report success in the most important thing. Family. We have successfully created a family with our girls.

This family is not like a typical nuclear family, nope it is different. The foundation for family, love, is there. We are connected and will remain so throughout the years. Yet we come from different places and sometimes see the world differently. Our girls are growing up. Only one of them, Edith, is still a minor. All the others are legal adults and capable of making decisions without us. Which they do frequently. Each one of them are still in school and rely on us one hundred percent for their livelihoods. Legal adulthood is here and practical adulthood is just around the corner. 

Four of them will be graduating high-school this year. That means four decisions on four different futures will be made soon. Vocational school, jobs, relocation, and relationships are all part of those decisions that have to be made. They will not all lead to success. There will be setbacks, failures, and mishaps along the way. However, just like the past decade each of those misfortunes will be handled with a family for support. We and this includes you, will be there for them, and hopefully, they will be there for us when we need them.

We have succeeded in love. We have a family. We have also triumphed in keeping the girls in school. They are healthy and able to make wise decisions about their health. They have experienced love and have confidence in us. They know, even if some of them do not acknowledge it, that we are here for them.

When I put it down on paper, not all our endeavors have found success, but the most important, providing family, has and is succeeding


A Little Equine Therapy Update

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Butterfly is hiding behind that post on her way to feed the horses. Each day they are fed four times with wheat bran, barley, and horse meal. Typically we feed them hay, but it has become hard to find and prohibitively expensive due to scarcity. They are also brushed, feet cleaned, and worked each day. It is a lot of work, but it is work with a purpose.
 
The horses are not just Kate's hobby. Nor did we buy the children ponies just to fulfill that seemingly ever present desire of young girls for a pony. We acquired the horses with the aim of using them as therapy animals. (Though of course some of our own children enjoy riding them as well.) There was a point in my spiritual journey that I decided to take Matthew 25 seriously. To aid and love "the least of these." Which is the reason we moved to Kenya.
 
And the King will answer and say to them, ‘Assuredly, I say to you, inasmuch as you did it to one of the least of these My brethren, you did it to Me.’ (Matthew 25:40)
 
Throughout the past twelve years we have tried to love and assist the least here in Kenya. We have fed the hungry, clothed the naked, cared for the sick, and assisted the oppressed as best as we can. We still do these things in fact. Yet we encountered many people that we struggled to be able to help. Disabled children were a big group in this category. We just had no way to bring joy and healing into their lives, until we encountered equine therapy. 
 
The horses do more than bring these children joy. Riding these animals forces the children's bodies to use muscles that otherwise are not exercised properly. It is a form of physical therapy using several hundreds of pounds of horse. The children sit on the horse and go through a program of games and activities designed to strengthen their backs, legs, arms, and minds. This all takes place within half an hour to a hour, but all the work to get to that small window is worth the smiles and future improvements.
 
We are still at the beginning of this aspect of our project, but it has begun well. We have a thoroughbred and three ponies to utilize. The Shire, our almost twelve acres here in East Africa, is not quite large enough for fields of grass for the horses, but we have created a flat space for them to be worked and buy food for them from town. (Surprisingly there is a sizable horse loving community here in Kenya. We have not had much difficulty in finding feed for them.) We are at the end of our dry season. The rains are on the way. The space we leveled to be able to do the therapy in has had grass planted and we await the rain to spur the growth. The horses seem to be waiting for the rain as well.  They miss all the yummy grass that dries up in the dry season. 
 
Thank you to everyone that helps make this program successful, and thanks to those who will help in the future. These children are worth the effort.

Thorny

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This particular bush, I have no idea what it is actually called, is thorny. It's thorns do not poke you, no in this bush's mind that would be too kind. Instead it metes out punishment with thorns that grab you. The more you struggle, the deeper the thorns go. I once grazed one of these while riding the motorcycle, glanced down at my arm to discover blood oozing from a dozen wounds. This bush is serious about thorns.

Asking for money is somewhat like this bush, thorny. Soon as I mention it I lose readers or listeners and we get lumped in with all the other people and projects asking for money. Yet we need money. 

April is coming to an end and it will be time to pay school fees. Which is around 75,000 KES or approximately $727 U.S. dollars. We could also use $2, ooo U.S. dollars to stock up the pantry and other items around the farm. There are other needs, some of which I cannot post online, but we need money. 

The good thing about getting stuck in our thorns, is that we are nice to be stuck to. We cannot promise blessings or riches in return for your money, but we can promise to use it to the best of our abilities to bring hopeful futures to children here in Kenya.

If you would like to risk the thorns follow this link:

How to Donate

There is also a handy app that will allow you to send money directly to our phones here in Kenya (we have a banking service on them and can purchase goods or withdraw the cash from our phone.) It is called Wave. We have used it many times successfully and find the exchange rate to be favorable to us on this side. Use my number +254723743212 https://www.wave.com/


Giving

We exist off the generosity of others. It is not always easy to accept that we must fund raise in order to survive and do what we are doing. Yet it has become easier over the years to come to appreciate the help and see how it is a way for others to be involved in what we do. Kate and I have made a commitment to each other that our interactions with people, i.e. potential donors, is not about raising money but is about relationship first. The fund raising comes second, third, if at all
 
All our income comes from donations. We are not able to work for profit in Kenya, and actually work full time on the project so there is little time to do business. When you send a donation through PayPal or the mail it is deposited in the bank in California and sent to us here in Kenya. Bob, who helps with the banking, does not take a cut. The banks do of course, but we get the bulk of it. (Kate works at negotiating exchange rates and is super friendly with the bank people on this side. Which means we tend to get good rates.) 
 
We use that money to help create hopeful futures for children here in Kenya. Kate and I do not take a salary, though our basic needs are met through the project. Works great for everything except retirement planning. 
 
We cannot promise eternal or earthly rewards for the gifts you give. (Though I have seen the law of sowing and reaping over and over in my life.) We will not send you a gift for giving, at least not all the time. We will pray for you and think of you often, and we will appreciate what you give. To the best of our abilities we use the money to sustain our lives and bring hope to children here in Kenya.
 
Here is how you can give:
 
Paypal
 
 
or 
 
Make check out to A Future and a Hope and mail to:
 
A Future and a Hope
c/o Bob Humphrey
7909 Walerga Rd STE 112-141
Antelope, CA 95843

It's Friday!

Hello Friday.
 
School is back in full force. 
 
Weekend is just over the horizon. I wonder if I can manage to pull off doing nothing this weekend? My guess is that with fifteen children, farm animals, and trees to water the answer will be a resounding no. Sigh. Someday a weekend will come that will bring the blessed nothingness.
 
Last night during dinner preparations our gas cylinder needed replacing. (No piped cooking gas in the house we use cylinders. You know like the ones you take camping, only these are bigger.) Fortunately we have two. Unfortunately the replacement has a problem with the nozzle or whatever you call that thing. So dinner was cooked over coals. Not as convenient, but more African. In fact we had a Kenyan dish. I suppose it was appropriate we cooked it on a jiko over charcoal.
 
Busy day today. I, Johnny, will be Kate's driver as she places orders for lumber to build three more animal stalls and collects various bits and pieces for that project in Nakuru. There is still an ongoing fund raiser to help with these costs. The stalls will house animals related to the horse therapy and another cow. (At least the cow is planned right now. We might change our minds and do goats.) Thankfully Kate generally rewards my driving her around with nice food, perhaps Chinese today?
 
What are your weekend plans? Chinese on the menu?
 

Happy Birthday Edith!

Fourteen. 
 
Today we celebrate Edith's birthday. She was the first Kenyan girl to move in with us back in 2007. She was a spunky little four year old at the time who adjusted to being with us quickly. Now at fourteen she can be quiet as a mouse or loud as a lion. She is allergic to work, but quick to help out with Starlette (our one year old.) Lasagna is her favorite food, and she likes playing games on the IPad.
 
Edith starts her class eight this week in primary school. The final year. It is a big year for Kenyan school children. The test at the end determines where you can go to secondary school. We are sure she will do fine and hopefully can even enjoy this final year of primary school. 
 
Since it is January, our hot time of the year, we are going to go swimming in town at a place called Kivu. When we get back there will be a giant chocolate chip cookie made and some kind of beef stir fry thing for dinner.
 
Happy birthday Edith.
 
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Horsepower

One of the fringe benefits of moving onto The Shire (our almost twelve acres here in rural Kenya) was Kate was able to rekindle her love for horses. Almost immediately after we moved she began a search for a horse. She learned quickly that finding a horse that we could afford here in Kenya was not easy. In fact it was almost impossible. She met many people with horses and made new friends along the way. Still no horse. When she was almost frantic with the quest, her search led her to an organization in Nairobi that used horses as therapy animals for disabled children. This organization gave her a horse that was not suitable for their use. This began our journey with horses and more importantly gave us a way to help more children.
 
I do not understand the bond Kate has with horses. They are not animals that I appreciate and I have never had a bond with anything other than a dog. Yet it does exist with some people, and especially with children. A child and a horse share something between themselves. There are benefits to the relationship, even if it is a fleeting encounter. Reminds me of a scene from this documentary we watched about horses with a guy named Martin Clunes. He ends up in a pen with a horse and just after looking into the animal's eyes has an emotional moment. If I remember correctly there were tears and all. Seemed silly at first to me, but I try and respect other's experiences. I tried it out. Stared into a horse's eye. It did not have the same effect on me, but after observing the eyes and the sense of thoughtfulness behind them, I can understand the connection some people feel they have with these animals. 
 
Horses make good therapy animals. The children get to ride the horse and it actually helps with their muscle development. Really. Amazing to think about. It is no miracle cure, but for these children even little advances can seem like miracles. It has to do with the way the horse moves and then the children have to utilize muscles to stay balanced and sitting up. These muscles do not normally get this exercise. Over time it can help them to sit up better and perhaps even walk better. 
 
There is also the emotional boost to the child. Unfortunately disabled people do not have much reason to be happy here in Kenya. We have encountered almost unbelievable situations involving disabled children and young adults in Nakuru. Including one young man chained to a wall. What I am trying to say that bringing even an hour or so of happiness to these children is worthwhile. They get to ride a horse. Many if not all of them have never even seen a horse, and now they get to touch and sit on one. The smiles and giggles have an impact on their well being. 
 
 
Here is another video where Kate talks about this Horsepower:
 


The Smallest

“Even the smallest person can change the course of the future.”
 
That is a quote from the character Galadriel in one of the Lord of the Rings movies. One of my favorite lines from the movies. It captures one of the core truths of the Lord of the Rings trilogy; that size does not determine fate. Size can also be translated to power or in our context of 2017 access to resources (funds.) Even the smallest can have an impact on someone's life.
 
 Kate and I are little when compared to other folks and organizations working with orphans. We do not have the fund raising abilities of bigger organizations. We cannot hire a professional fund raiser who will do the work for us. We have to do it ourselves. Which honestly is alright by us.
 
Back in 2004 when we were planning on coming back to Kenya I really felt that we should not attempt raising money in typical missionary fashion. Meaning that we would not travel around raising a certain percentage of support before moving to Kenya. Instead we sent out a letter to everyone we knew and got on a plane. We arrived in Nairobi with four hundred dollars to our name and have not looked back since. Not the smartest thing to do when compared say to most mission agencies or something like the Red Cross. However, going against the grain is something we do well, and we needed to learn to depend on someone other than ourselves. 
 
We survived and have in fact thrived over the past twelve years. Sure we always need money (currently we need money for paying school fees, plus we want to get at least five more children in school this month,) and we are jealous from time to time of those folks working with organizations that can provide them with salaries, vacations, vehicles, and access to resources for the work. (We are especially jealous of those vacations.) We do enjoy our freedom and ability to connect with those we want to help and we even have relationships, bonafide relationships with our donors. We know the day to day struggle and that helps us to help others.
 
We are small, but we are changing the future. One child at a time. Frodo in the Lord of the Rings story, was a tiny hobbit. He did not have any power or influence outside of the world of hobbits. Yet it was him and his trusty servant Sam that changed the course of the third age. In fact it could not have been done by anyone else. There is a place for those big organizations. They can do wonders in disaster situations and when it comes to distributing large quantities of relief aid. There is also a place, in fact I believe most places, for the small guys. We can pinpoint aid in ways that an institution cannot. We know those we assist. We can tailor that assistance to best help them and bring them to a place where they no longer need us. It is in the interest of those working for big organizations for the people they assist to keep needing that assistance. Kate and I are interested in the opposite. We want those we help to grow and be able to stand on their own. Then they stand with us and turn around and help the next guy up. Being small enables us to do this.